How to Help Your Child Become a Stronger Writer - Brainchecker

How to Help Your Child Become a Stronger Writer

Welcome to Brain Checker,

As we all know,Writing is an important part of our daily lives. It is, however, a difficult skill to learn and master. By getting a head start with some simple activities, you can help your child begin to develop her writing skills at an early age. By doing so you will be contributing to her future success as a student and as an adult while teaching her how to express herself.

In this article, we provide some reasons that writing is an important skill for people of all ages, as well as a list of suggestions that will help your child become a stronger writer.

Why is writing important?

Writing is practical

Every day, we need to write in order to complete our tasks, whether we are filling out a form at the doctor’s office or writing an important letter. These tasks require us to write clearly, and organize information effectively.

Writing is an important element of a student’s education

Whether students are writing by hand or on the computer, many assignments and exams require students to write short answers or longer essays as a way of assessing what they have learned. As students get older, they will be expected to show more sophisticated writing skills, and to complete more sophisticated tasks through their writing. In addition, many colleges and universities require students to write essays as part of their admissions application.

What Can You Do?

It’s important to remember that writing can be as difficult a subject to teach and assess as it is to learn. Many students have trouble writing with clarity, coherence, and organization, and this can discourage them from writing if they feel frustrated.

That’s where parent involvement can make a big difference. Encouraging your child to develop strong writing skills at a young age, and to become a better writer as she gets older, can have a lifelong positive impact on her writing, and may make writing an easier and more enjoyable process for her

To get you started, the Department of Education offers a number of ideas of things you can do help your child become a stronger writer. While many of these ideas apply to younger children, they can be adapted for older children as well.

Ideas for Parents: How to Help Your Child Become a Stronger Writer

What You Need

  • Pencils, crayons, or markers
  • Yarn or ribbon
  • Writing paper or notebook
  • Cardboard or heavy paper
  • Construction paper
  • Safety scissors

Before getting started

Provide a place

It’s important for your child to have a good place to write, such as a desk or table with a smooth, flat surface. It’s also crucial to have good lighting.

Provide the materials

Provide plenty of paper (lined and unlined) and things to write with, including pencils, pens, and crayons.

Brainstorm

Talk with your child as much as possible about her ideas and impressions, and encourage her to describe people and events to you.

Activities for young children

Encourage the child to draw and to discuss her drawings

Ask your child questions about her drawings such as:

“What is the boy doing?”
“Does the house look like ours?”
“Can you tell a story about this picture?”

Show an interest in, and ask questions about, the things your child says, draws, and may try to write.

Ask your child to tell you simple stories as you write them down

Copy the story as your child tells it, without making changes. Ask her to clarify anything you don’t understand.

Encourage your child to write her name

Practice writing her name with her, and point out the letters in her name when you see them in other places (on signs, in stores, etc.). She may start by only writing the first few letters of her name, but soon the rest will follow.

Use games

There are numerous games and puzzles that help children with spelling while increasing their vocabulary. Some of these may include crossword puzzles, word games, anagrams, and cryptograms designed especially for children. Flash cards are fun to use too, and they’re easy to make at home.

Turn your child’s writing into books

Paste her drawings and writings on pieces of construction paper. For each book, make a cover out of heavier paper or cardboard, and add special art, a title, and her name as author. Punch holes in the pages and cover, and bind the book together with yarn or ribbon.

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Day-to-Day Activities

Make sure your child sees you writing

She will learn about writing by watching you write. Talk with her about your writing so that she begins to understand why writing is important and the many ways it can be used.

Encourage your child to write, even if she’s scribbling

Give your child opportunities to practice writing by helping her sign birthday cards, write stories, and make lists.

As your child gets older, write together

Have your child help you with the writing you do, including writing letters, shopping lists, and messages.

Suggest note-taking

Encourage your child to take notes on trips or outings, and to describe what she saw. This could include a description of nature walks, a boat ride, a car trip, or other events that lend themselves to note-taking.

Encourage copying

If your child likes a particular song, suggest that she learn the words by writing them down. Also encourage copying favorite poems or quotations from books and plays.

Encourage your child to read her stories out loud

As your child gets older, ask her to share her stories with you. Listen carefully without interrupting, and give her positive feedback about her ideas and her writing!

Hang a family message board in the kitchen

Offer to write notes there for your child. Be sure that she finds notes left there for her.

Help your child write letters and emails to relatives and friends

These may include thank you notes or just a special note to say hello. Be sure to send your child a letter or card once in awhile too so that she is reminded of how special it is to get a letter in the mail. Consider finding a pen pal for your child.

Encourage keeping a journal

This is excellent writing practice as well as a good outlet for venting feelings. Encourage your child to write about things that happen at home and school, about people she likes or dislikes and why, and about things she wants to remember and do. If she wants to share the journal with you, read the entries and discuss them together.

Things to remember

Allow time

Help your child spend time thinking about a writing project or exercise. Good writers often spend a lot of time thinking, preparing, and researching before starting to write. Your child may dawdle, sharpen a pencil, get papers ready, or look up the spelling of a word. Be patient — this may all be part of her preparation.

Respond to your child’s writing

Respond to the ideas your child expresses verbally or in writing. Make it clear that you are interested in what the writing conveys, which means focusing on “what” the child has written rather than “how” it was written. It’s usually wise to ignore minor errors, particularly at the stage when your child is just getting ideas together.

Praise your child’s writing

Take a positive approach and find good things to say about your child’s writing. Is it accurate? Descriptive? Original? Creative? Thoughtful? Interesting?

Avoid writing for your child

Don’t write a paper for your child that will be turned in as her work, and don’t rewrite your child’s work. Meeting a writing deadline, taking responsibility for the finished product, and feeling ownership of it are also important parts of the writing process.

writing skills

Help your child with her writing as she gets older

Ask your child questions that will help her clarify the details of her stories and assignments as they get longer, and help her organize her thoughts. Talk about the objective of what she is writing.

Provide your child with spelling help when she’s ready for it

When your child is just learning how to read and write, she may try different ways to write and spell. Our job is to encourage our children’s writing so they will enjoy putting their thoughts and ideas on paper. At first, your child may begin to write words the way that she hears them. For example, she might write “haf” instead of “have”, “frn” instead of “friend”, and “Frd” instead of “Fred.” This actually is a positive step in developing her phonemic awareness. Keep practicing with her, and model the correct spelling of words when you write. As your child gets older and begins to ask more questions about letters and spelling, provide her with the help she needs.

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Practice, practice, practice

Writing well takes lots of practice, so make sure your child doesn’t get discouraged too easily. It’s not easy! Give her plenty of opportunities to practice so that she has the opportunity to improve.

Read together

Reading and writing support each other. The more your child does of each, the better she will be at both. Reading can also stimulate your child to write about her own family or school life. If your child has a particular favorite story or author, ask her why she thinks that story or that person’s writing is special.

As you read and write more with your child, you will be building an important foundation, and taking steps that will help your child to become a better reader, writer, and student. Your efforts now will make a difference — and it may be just the difference that your child needs to succeed!

we hope you find this article useful..!

 

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About the Author: Keya Raje

Senior Counselor ,M.A. Psychology.

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